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Bang for YOUR BUCK in Building your Classroom Library

Classroom Library
YAY for all the new teachers getting teaching assignments for the upcoming school year. It is a wonderful space to be in as you prepare for what your classroom will look like and what kind of teacher you will be. If you will be teaching English, Reading, or Writing I know one big concern is “how on earth am I going to build my classroom library!” I am not going to tell you that it is easy, but it will be worth the effort curating. This first post will be all about the all- important MONEY angle.



Teachers

Look for retiring teachers or teachers changing grade levels because they will be a free source of books. You can visit your new school and seek out those teachers. I would also suggest going on Facebook Marketplace or CraigsList because many teachers have been successful in finding books for free or in bulk using those avenues. 

Grants

There are many options available to get grants and I am fortunate that I am in as district that sends out monthly list of grants including lesser known ones. But the more popular choices to get grant funded that every teacher should know about it is Adopt a Classroom and Donor’s Choose.

Companies

Listed below are my go to sources if I need to buy books myself. I check prices between each since prices fluctuate and some sites have sales so for me, Amazon isn’t always the best priced.
1.     Amazon first. The goal is to always beat their amazing prices. Shipping on books is free at $25.00 or more.
2.     Scholastic has great sales and often has $1.00 books. Right now they are having 40% off paperbacks. In addition, various times a year across the country, they host warehouse sales. See my previous post Shopping A Scholastic Saleon how to shop a warehouse sale effectively.
3.     Barnes and Noble offers a teacher discount card and periodically offers coupons.
4.     Half Price Books is another good source.
5.     AKJ Education runs sales periodically
6.     First Book is a not for profit that sells books heavily discounted. Teachers must register in order to purchase.
7.     Follett is an often missed source. They have a greater selection (paperback and hardcover) since they run the software for many school libraries.

Public Libraries

Libraries tend to sell used books and have a great selection. In my area I get paperbacks at .25-.50 and hardcovers from $1.00. You would be surprised at the selection of both current and classic books that you will find at a library sale.

Scholastic

A teacher must (in my opinion) create a free account with Scholastic Reading Club. Not only can students order but teachers can order as well. They offer terrific pricing especially on their book packs along with $1.00 books. The best part for every teacher and student order, you collect bonus points. Get ready to collect your first BIG BOX. Use the coupon below for free 250 bonus points to start you off when you include my referral code: 2069607006




Look out next week with my MUST LIST OF BOOKS FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL DIVERSITY!

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